DEBENTURES

DEBENTURES

 

 The issue of debentures by public limited companies is regulated by Companies Act 1956. Debenture is a document, which either creates a debt or acknowledges it. Debentures are issued through a prospectus. A debenture is issued by a company and is usually in the form of a certificate, which is an acknowledgement of indebtedness. They are issued under the company’s seal. Debentures are one of a series issued to a number of lenders.

 

The date of repayment is invariably specified in the debenture. Generally debentures are issued against a charge on the assets of the company. Debentures may, however, be issued without any such charge. Debenture holders have no right to vote in the meetings of the company.

 

Kinds of Debentures

 

1.   Bearer Debentures: They are registered and are payable to its bearer .They are negotiable instruments and are transferable by delivery.

 

2.   Registered Debentures: They are payable to the registered holder whose name appears both on debenture and in the register of debenture holders maintained by the company. Registered debentures can be transferred but have to be registered again. Registered debentures are not negotiable instruments. PI registered debenture contains a commitment to pay the principal sum and interest. It also has a description of the charge and a statement that it is issued subject to the conditions endorsed therein.

 

3.   Secured Debentures: Debentures which create a charge on the assets of the company, which may be fixed or floating, are known as secured debentures

 

4.   Unsecured or Naked Debentures: Debentures, which are issued without any charge on assets, are unsecured or naked debentures, The holders are like unsecured creditors and may sue the company for recovery of debt.

 

5.   Redeemable Debentures: Normally debentures are issued on the condition that they shall be redeemed after a certain period. They can, however, be reissued after redemption under Section 121 of Companies Act 1956.

 

6.   Perpetual Debentures: When debentures are irredeemable they are called Perpetual.

 

 

7.   Convertible Debentures: If an option is given to convert debentures into equity shares at stated rate of exchange after a specified period they are called convertible debentures. In our country the convertible debentures are very popular. On conversion, the holders cease to be lenders and become owners. Debentures are usually issued in a series with a pari passu (at the same rate) clause which entitles them to be discharged rate ably though issued at different times. New series of debentures cannot rank pari passu with old series unless the old series provides so.

 

8.   New debt instruments issued by public limited companies are participating debentures, convertible debentures with options, third party convertible debentures, and convertible debentures redeemable at premium, debt equity swaps and zero coupon convertible notes.

 

9.   Participating Debentures: They are unsecured corporate debt securities, which participate in the profits of the company. They might find investors if issued by existing dividend paying companies.

 

10.                Convertible Debentures with Options: They are a derivative of convertible debentures with an embedded option, providing flexibility to the issuer as well as the investor to exit from the terms of the issue. The coupon rate is specified at the time of issue.

 

 

 

11.                Third Party convertible Debentures: They are debt with a warrant allowing the investor to subscribe to the equity of a third firm at a preferential vis-à-vis the market price. Interest rate on third party convertible debentures is lower than pure debt on account of the conversion option.

 

12.                Convertible Debentures Redeemable at a premium: Convertible debentures are issued at face value with an option entitling investors to later sell the bond to the issuer at a premium. They are basically similar to convertible debentures but embody less risk.

 

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